What Are Terpenes?

Feb 12th 2020

What Are Terpenes?

Terpenes are hydrocarbons that are generally responsible for the distinct tastes and smells we experience in nature. Originally, plants evolved to express terpenes to avoid getting eaten. Plants also use these compounds to attract pollinators.

Terpenes show up in high amounts in a variety of essential oils. For instance, limonene is present in the essential oil of lemons and limes. Additionally, alpha and beta-pinene are found in the essential oil of pine needles. The terpenoids in these oils produce the smell of lemons and pine forests. In addition, the terpene linalool is the predominant compound found in lavender. These compounds, and thousands more, also show up in the flowers of cannabis.

Why are Terpenes Important?

  1. They communicate with the body's endocannabinoid system to bring therapeutic benefits.
  2. They work synergistically with cannabinoids to bring about homeostasis.
  3. Terpenoids give foods their natural flavor.

Fresh Bros uses only natural terpenes in our hemp extracts because synthetic terpenoids are inferior and we believe in only using the best. Each unique cannabis strain will reveal a different profile of terpenes, each present in different concentrations.

Myrcene ranks as most common terpene in cannabis and it offers powerful tranquilizing effects. Limonene shows up in citrus fruits and it can increase a person's energy. Terpinolene features a smokey smell and may ease feelings of stress. Over 15,000 terpenoids have already been identified and plant biologists are always identifying more. Considering that each offers a treasure trove of health benefits, the possibilities seem endless. Terpenes show incredible promise when used in conjunction with cannabinoids. Discovering which terps are available in a given product can be challenging. Full panel lab tests that show terpene profiles can aid patients in finding what works best for them.

Notice to legality:

The photos contained on this page might look like marijuana concentrates, but they actually show legal terpenes. Historic legislation establishes the legality of industrial hemp produced in state pilot agricultural programs. Congress provides the requisite definition for allowable amounts of THC. Industrial hemp’ means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis”.

An important legal distinction also appears in the first sentence of this bill. It states: “Notwithstanding the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 801 et seq.), the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (20 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), chapter 81 of title 41, United States Code, or any other Federal law”. Moreover, the term “notwithstanding” became widely used by the 114th Congress as a way to supersede previous laws that may apply, without going through the process of overturning them. This confirms that hemp cannot be considered “marijuana” under the CSA.

Consolidated Appropriations Act, Sec. 763 (2016)

This legislation marks the omnibus federal budget for FY2016. In addition, according to 7 U.S.C. §5940, the term “industrial hemp” means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9 THC) concentration of not more than 0.3% on a dry weight basis. Furthermore, only the Delta-9 THC level remains relevant, not THC-A. This hemp flower contains a Delta-9 THC level on a dry weight basis equal to 0%, well below the 0.3% maximum level and, therefore, this reflects hemp, not marijuana, and remains perfectly legal to possess and sell.  In addition, this right applies in any state pursuant to the Full Faith and Credit Clause, Article VI, Section 1 of the Constitution, the Supremacy Clause, Article VI, Section 2 of the Constitution, and the Equal Protection Clause, Section 1 of the Fourteenth Amendment.